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20120924
20120924
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
catholics living in the united states. thousands journey to carthage each year for the marian days festival, a four-day pilgrimage to give thanks to the virgin mary for the safety and freedom they feel they enjoy in america. >> it's like a divine providence that we happened to be right in the middle of the united states. everybody can come over here, you know, just the whole family gathering. but the second part is just the spiritual side of things, because through the year there's all this hardship, working, and it's just a week to come here just to pray and listen to conferences to nourish their spiritual side. >> about 500 people came in 1978, the first year of the festival. today, between 50,000 and 60,000 people attend, making it one of the largest ethnic festivals in the u.s. the centerpiece of the pilgrimage is this statue of the virgin mary, one of only six like it in the world. vietnamese mothers usually take the lead in passing on the faith, and this has translated into a deep devotion within the community to the blessed mother. sister maria nguyen, a benedictine sister from kansa
in the united states senate where i've worked with many republicans to do important things like cutting spending, putting a cap on federal spending, like banning earmarks, like cutting taxes, over a trillion dollars for small businesses and working families. cleaning up war contracting and protecting and promoting american jobs. todd has worked closely with michele bachmann, and together them and a few others have really pushed things that would really harm missouri families. on march 8th of 2011, todd akin said i don't like social security, i think it's a bad investment. he's gone on in this campaign to delineate what is the triple whammy to social security. not only does he not like it, he would privatize it, put it on the roller coaster of wall street. he would raise the retirement age, and he would lower the benefit. on august 18th of 2011, he said medicare was unconstitutional. and since that time he has, in fact, voted several times to voucherrize medicare, to turn seniors over to private insurance companies, to arm wrestle with them for coverage and whether their claims will be paid and m
to host this debate. my name a jonathan dine and i'm a libertarian candidate for the united states senate. like many of you, i'm tired of the constant fighting of the republicans and democrats. beating the other team has become more important. america is now on the verge of a financial collapse and both parties are to blame with their wreckless tax, borrow and spend policies. neither party seriously about balancing the budget or lowering your taxes or restoring your personal freedom. for as long as i can remember, republican and democrat politicians offering up solutions. higher and higher taxes. enough is enough. as a libertarian senator, i will stand up for your personal freedom, i'm socially accepting and tolerance. i'm also fiscalally responsible. i'm tired of the wreckless spending and the wreckless earmarks as your senator, i will vote no to wreckless spending, vote no to any legislation where spending exceeds revenue. i will advocate on the part of the balanced budget amendment. the government should live within its means just like the people of missouri. supporting my candidacy m
in the united states versus virginia, calling for women to enter the military institute and he also wrote a landmark case concluding that the family would -- family medical leave a ct apply to state employers. when you think about the overall evolution of the doctrine and you look at his evolution, how do you explain it? >> let me go back to the case he -- you first mentioned. it was my last argument before the court. it was in the fall of 1978. it was a case about putting women on juries. it is not all that long ago that many states either did not put women on juries at all or allow them to sign up if they wanted to serve or had an opt- out system this case was of the latter kind, it was from the state of missouri. the court in kansas city would rk in kansasin kansa city would send out notices for jury duty and the notice would say if you are a woman, you are not required to serve. if you don't wish to serve, check here. if no card was returned, the clerk would assume that the woman did not want to serve. this was at a time when most states had changed. there were just a few holdouts,
to show you what's going on in the united states at that time, so that's pretty cool. >> we are back live at theesti e national book festival on the mall in washington, d.c. booktv on c-span2. [applause] and as you can see where the great audience still here in thn history and biography tent. we'rebi joined by jean edward smith, and eisenhowerher and biographer, and, of course, david and julie nixon eisenhower, grandson and granddaughterei in law, and, off course, thought of president nixon. so we are very pleased that o erybody here.we areng t we're going to put the number's up on the screen. the eisenhower's and mr. smith were talking are there with earl jonathan yardley, so you heard a presenout their presentation. we hav one question for each. where people lined up a linda peeno give everybody a chance.cc i'm just going to get mye out o questions out of theut o way rel fast. jean edward smith, did president eisenhower like campaigning? >> certainly not in 1952. in 1952, this was the new job that he had but he learned it effectively ended 1956, he campaigned. no, he did not like it. >>
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)